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Being Affectionate Doesn’t Mean Spoiled!

All parents want happiness for their children. Sometimes parents tend to forget the most important thing which needs to be provided to children which is LOVE. ❤️⠀

Often, many parents are surprised when their little ones demonstrate strong feelings of affection. They may wonder if a baby or toddler can have the emotional skills to show such feelings? Of course, the answer is an emphatic yes. Most children form deep, loving bonds with their parents and friends from a very early age. Even newborns feel attachment from the moment they’re born!⠀

Young babies bond emotionally with people who give them regular care and affection. A baby is dependent on caregivers for everything from nourishment to safety, so an initial bond is very strong. It also sets the standard for what a baby expects in later relationships in terms of emotional security, trust, and predictability.⠀

Before 8 months of age, a baby’s signs of affection are rather subtle. That is, until stranger anxiety and separation anxiety kick in. Hand your baby to a relative or babysitter and the child will cry for you.⠀

Other signs may be subtle: Your 9-month-old lights up when a friend comes over and is sad when the friend leaves.⠀

Around the 1-year mark, babies learn affectionate behaviours such as kissing. It starts as an imitative behaviour but as a baby repeats these behaviours and sees that they bring happy responses from the people, the baby becomes aware of pleasing people and will start to use these behaviours more frequently.⠀

❣️ Love can help your child to succeed ❣️⠀

✔️ Love helps your child’s mental well-being.⠀
✔️ Love makes your child physically healthier.⠀
✔️ Love increases your child’s brain development and memory.⠀
✔️ Love creates a stronger bond between parent and child.⠀
✔️ Love makes your child less fearful and more well rounded.”

Image via @moomysmilk on Instagram

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dlw.821
dlw.821
1 month ago

I agree with this. Letting your baby “cry it out” is not a valid solution. Babies cry because they need something. They learn trust as you attend to their needs. I always held my baby while bottle feeding, it help create the bond. I miss those days and nights ❤️

yasminefindlay
yasminefindlay
1 month ago

🖤

ang_galan
ang_galan
1 month ago

❤️

Posted By Claire

Claire is our Community Manager here at New Moms Forum. A mom of two (almost grown-up babies), Claire has been building and operating community-based websites for almost 20 years. In her downtime, Claire enjoys spending time with her family and drinking copious amounts of red wine!

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